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F-35A Lightning II Review

Italeri 1/32 F-35A Lightning II Kit Build Review

By Michael Benolkin

Date of Review March 2018 Manufacturer Italeri
Subject F-35A Lightning II Scale 1/32
Kit Number 2506 Primary Media Styrene, Photo-Etch
Pros Nicest F-35 kit in any scale to date Cons See text
Skill Level Basic MSRP (USD) $119.00

Build Review

For a brief history of this subject and a look at this kit out of the box, look here.

As with previous Italeri large-scale projects, the best place to start is the instruction book. This instruction book is laid out in Italeri's easy-to-follow style and it will give you a sense of the progression and what to expect. You won't find any surprises or challenges (so far) but it is clear from my examination that there is a lot of preparation work to do, so let's get started.

While my spousal unit was elsewhere, I washed the sprues with Dawn dish soap to remove any mold release agent and let the sprues air dry. Since I wanted to do some dry-fitting of the major assemblies, I started with the upper and lower fuselage halves. I removed the sprue tree inside the air refueling receiver opening on the upper half and the larger sprue structure in the weapons bay opening of the lower half. I used a file to remove any sprue tree remnants and flash before dry-fitting the fuselage together. The fit is excellent.

F-35A Lightning II ReviewF-35A Lightning II Review

Aside from the cockpit, the model is painted in essentially two colors - outside is gray, inside is white. I used Tamiya Gloss White to paint all of the various interior parts, intake trunks, weapons and wheel well bays, landing gear, door interiors, hinges, etc. Once the white had dried, I assembled the intake trunks as it consists of four parts and would be a potential fit problem but alas, it assembled with no problems.

F-35A Lightning II Review

As I mentioned in my first-look at this kit, there is an access panel that goes between the weapons bays. Since I'm not going to do much with the engine, I glued that panel into place to add more rigidity to the lower fuselage half. I also glued the forward fuselage panels that have the distinctive intake bulge into place. Next, I dry-assembled the engine and it is held together by the fuselage cross-member. I placed the unassembled weapons bay shells into the lower fuselage half along with the intake assembly and the dry-fit engine assembly. No fit issues here.

F-35A Lightning II Review

With the upper fuselage half snapped into place (dry-fit), there are no fit issues and you can see only the rear-most section of the engine from here and that will be covered soon enough. This confirms in my mind that there is zero need to paint the engine because the neither the engine shell nor the compressor face will be visible once the fuselage is assembled. Only the afterburner chamber and nozzle will be exposed. The interior of the nozzle and afterburner chamber are pre-painted white and will be slightly weathered soon to represent the ceramic coating of the afterburner interior.

F-35A Lightning II Review

Here's the dry-fit fuselage assembly from underneath and the afterburner nozzle is fitted as well. Those huge weapons bays are white per the instructions, but they can't be that plain in appearance.

F-35A Lightning II Review

With the dry-fitting completed, here is the lower fuselage with the fuselage/intake inserts and the ventral access panel glued into place.

F-35A Lightning II Review

So here are the weapons bay shells pre-painted white per the instructions but without the rear bulkheads and other parts installed. Italeri did a great job with the interior details, but all-white?

F-35A Lightning II Review

After scavenging through the internet for weapons bay photos, I was taken by the copper-colored cable runs and black plumbing in those bays. While the examples I was seeing may have been flight test aircraft, I'm building an AFOTEC bird so I should be good-to-go. You can see what a difference a little detail painting makes inside those bays. I hand-painted the details with Tamiya and Gunze gloss acrylics before washing the key details with AK Interactive Gray Panel Line Wash.

Note: You do not want to use washes on flat paint as the wash will flow into the flat paint's textured surface. If you do paint with flats, use a coat of clear gloss or Future to smooth/protect the paint, and the gray wash will perform as advertised.

F-35A Lightning II Review

While in the image above, one of the bays was still all-white, here I've applied the same Tamiya and Gunze colors to the details. You can see in contrast to the bay on the top, there is no real depth to the newly painted bay below it.

F-35A Lightning II Review

Here I've applied gray panel line wash to the newly painted bay and added wash to the frames of the other bay. The beauty of these washes is that they cover many minor errors in your hand-painting and they do not require any precision in application (clearly from my work). As long as you've applied the wash to either a gloss finish or a gloss-covered flat finish, you can literally rub the excess away. Any stubborn spots are resolved with a Q-Tip dabbed in mineral spirits and resume wiping with a clean paper towel. These bays are now ready for the rest of the parts so we can move on.

F-35A Lightning II ReviewF-35A Lightning II Review

Here are the completed weapons bays. I jumped ahead to add the suspension system for the JDAMs included in the kit. This turned out to be a good thing as it took some experimentation to see where on the beam the units should go and allow for tail clearance on the bombs. I wouldn't want to do this when the bays are installed and the doors are all in the way.

F-35A Lightning II Review

The upper and lower fuselage halves have holes that require drilling which I opened up and cleaned up before mounting the weapons bays. The bays are mounted in the fuselage and we can finally move on to other tasks!

F-35A Lightning II Review

While I was dry-fitting the intakes, I noticed a mold glitch just outside each intake - a recess into the styrene surface that will need to be filled. I've already applied Mr. Surfacer 500 to the seams of the fuselage/intake inserts.

F-35A Lightning II Review

Here's another look at that mold recess that will need a bit of putty. No serious problem, just a little bodywork.

F-35A Lightning II Review

With the weapons bays installed, I finished up the engine and with the previously assembled and painted intakes, mounted them into the lower fuselage. The intakes required some additional fitting to get as close to a snug fit to the intake edges on the lower fuselage. I glued the lower and outboard surfaces in place and set the assembly aside to dry.

F-35A Lightning II Review

I used a Q-Tip trimmed to fit as a wedge to press the fuselage inserts out to meet the inboard edges of the intakes. Once the glue had cured, we're ready to move on.

F-35A Lightning II Review

Once again, I have the fuselage halves dry-fitted just to ensure that nothing is obstructing that fit. You see the various inserts in the upper fuselage are installed and the afterburner nozzle is also dry-fitted in place. It is nearing time to go back and finish up the cockpit.

F-35A Lightning II Review

Insert a several-month time gap here. Yes, the project was set aside because I was waiting to see what aftermarket solutions would be coming for a few key hurdles.

Back into the cockpit. Eduard released two color-printed photo-etched detail sets, one for the cockpit, the other for the pilot restraints on the ejection seat. As usual, the photo-etched parts for the cockpit are a bit over-engineered, but using selected parts rendered the look I was seeking. In addition to the over-engineering, Eduard sometimes uses odd colors in their color-printing process. Such was the case with the cockpit gray which has a tinge too much purple in the mix. They also opted to present the monitor displaying a notional status screen which means the aircraft (model) is powered-up. Since I'm posing the canopy open anyway, I opted to leave the display as-is, but it would be just as easy to spray dark green/gray over the screen and power it down again.

The first step is to remove the molded-on details on the panels before adding the photo-etched parts. The final result looks nice.

F-35A Lightning II ReviewF-35A Lightning II ReviewF-35A Lightning II ReviewF-35A Lightning II Review

The pilot restraints are now using the ultra-thin steel process which makes these easy to pose and place on the seat.

F-35A Lightning II Review

The cockpit is completed and here's what it looks like dry-fitted to the upper fuselage half. There's still more painting and details to be done on and around the canopy sill, but that is coming up soon.

F-35A Lightning II ReviewF-35A Lightning II Review

The wheel wells are painted and a gray wash applied to bring out the details. The landing gear struts receive the same treatment before the three wells are assembled.

F-35A Lightning II ReviewF-35A Lightning II Review

The wheel wells are installed in the lower fuselage and set aside to dry. Given the mass of the model, I don't want a gear strut or well to pop loose after the fuselage is closed up.

F-35A Lightning II ReviewF-35A Lightning II ReviewF-35A Lightning II Review

While the wheel wells dry in the fuselage, it is time to assemble the wings and tail feathers. While the fit of the model is very good, Italeri did leave some gaps in some of the wing halves out under the wingtips and the inboard vertical stabilizer surfaces. They tried to make them blend into the surrounding scribed panels, but the gaps are wider than the scribed panel lines and there are no such gaps/panel lines on the full-sized aircraft. The solution is simple with a couple of applications of Mr.Surfacer 500 and some wet-sanding. These photos show the Mr.Surfacer applied and drying.

F-35A Lightning II ReviewF-35A Lightning II Review

Here's that magic moment in any aircraft build when the model is standing on its landing gear. I've been wondering how the weight and balance would be on the model since no ballast is called out in the instructions. While I'll leave the radome off as long as possible, so far the model doesn't appear to have a tail-sitting tendency. I've painting the instrument panel coming and need to paint the rear deck behind the cockpit before gluing the upper fuselage half into place.

F-35A Lightning II Review

With the fuselage halves glued together, the wings glued into place and the design of the wing/fuselage joint sets the wing angle very nicely. Nevertheless, there is still some play in the joint and with the wing glued, you must keep pressure on the joint to minimize the gaps. No matter what you do, there will be gaps here, but with a little effort and the new Tamiya quick-setting liquid cement, the gaps were minimized. Here I have the F-35 in the HobbyZone USA PS01 aircraft jig to keep the loads off the landing gear while I work on those wing/fuselage gaps.

F-35A Lightning II ReviewF-35A Lightning II Review

Here is a look at the upper surface of the model with a combination of thin strip styrene and Mr. Surfacer 500 applied to the seams. It took three applications to get the seams removed.

F-35A Lightning II Review

The upper surface of the model after the excess filler is removed and the surface is buffed smooth, ready for a base coat.

F-35A Lightning II Review

And the lower wing/fuselage joint received the same treatment.

F-35A Lightning II Review

I started to fit the weapons bay doors which will be glued closed with white glue to serve as a mask for painting. While glue is easy to clean up and doesn't harm the paint. I also added the horizontal stabilators and realized that the leading and trailing edge flaps have the same underside seam as the stabs which needed filling. Now that they're cleaned up, the flight control surfaces are in place and I'll get the rest of the doors glued closed, canopy glued closed, and the struts/exposed wells masked off so I can apply the base coat.

F-35A Lightning II Review

To be continued...

Note: While the instructions identify the basic colors used on the airframe, you can refer to my own photo walk around of the aircraft, to see there are other subtle shades on the surface of the aircraft which will make the appearance of the model less monotonous. You can also see how the RAM details are virtually flush with the surrounding airframe surfaces.

My sincere thanks to Italeri SPA for this review sample!

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