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U.S. Army Ambulances and Medical Vehicles in World War II

U.S. Army Ambulances and Medical Vehicles in World War II Book Review

By David L. Veres

Date of Review August 2020 Title U.S. Army Ambulances and Medical Vehicles in World War II
Author Didier Andres Publisher Aviation Collectables
Published 2020 ISBN 9781612008653
Format 144 pages, softbound MSRP (USD) $37.95

Review

“Of all the participants in World War II,” Didier Andres writes, “the United States developed an unparalleled medical structure.”

“The efforts this nation expended to ensure their soldiers’ survival were unsurpassed,” he continues, “and the means used went beyond anything else that existed at the time.”

Now Andres confirms those contentions in an intensely illuminating history of U.S. Army Ambulances and Medical Vehicles in World War II – part of the “Casemate Illustrated” range.

His slim, succinct study spans 160 pages across 16 lavishly illustrated chapters:

  • Introduction
  • Metropolitan Ambulances
  • Multipatient Ambulances
  • Field Litter Carriers
  • Front-Line Ambulances
  • Medic Jeeps
  • Rescue Teams
  • Medical Trucks
  • Reverse Lend-Lease
  • Field Ambulances
  • Ambulance Markings
  • Field Ambulances On the Front
  • Different Missions, Different Uses
  • The American Red Cross
  • The American Field Service
  • Enigmas

An ambulance is, well, an ambulance – right?

Not so. Andres rightly reminds readers that today’s ambulances differ noticeably in equipment and purpose from their less amply furnished WWII ancestors.

Nor does Andres restrict remarks to U.S. Army topics – or even to WWII vehicles. Text also notes U.S. Navy subjects and trailers. And coverage even cites postwar developments.

B&W photos and color shots illustrate the account. Tables of vehicle specifications, serials, and orders also supplement the survey. And artwork illustrating official regulations provide authoritative markings details.

Modeling an Operation Overlord ambulance? Look here.

What a cool compendium! Wheeled, tracked, towed, rail-adapted, and converted, intriguing vehicles of all sort season U.S. Army Ambulances and Medical Vehicles in World War II.

Make Andres’ handy hardback your introduction to this surprisingly absorbing subject.

With thanks to Casemate Publishing for the review copy!