Cybermodeler Online

Celebrating 23 years of hobby news and reviews

PROUDLY SPONSORED BY:

  • modelrectifier.com
  • culttvmanshop.com
  • bnamodelworld.com
  • horizon-models.com
  • luckymodel.com
  • hobbyzone.biz
  • stores.ebay.com/tacairhobbies

NOTICE:

The appearance of U.S. Air Force, U.S. Army, U.S. Navy, U.S. Marine Corps, U.S. Coast Guard, Department of Defense, or NASA imagery or art does not constitute an endorsement nor is Cybermodeler Online affiliated with these organizations.

FOLLOW US:

  • Facebook
  • Parler
  • Twitter
  • RSS
  • YouTube

The Yugoslav Air Force in the Battles for Slovenia, Croatia and Bosnia and Herzegovina 1991-92 Vol.1

The Yugoslav Air Force in the Battles for Slovenia, Croatia and Bosnia and Herzegovina 1991-92 Vol.1 Book Review

By David L. Veres

Date of Review October 2020 Title The Yugoslav Air Force in the Battles for Slovenia, Croatia and Bosnia and Herzegovina 1991-92 Vol.1
Author Aleksandar Radic Publisher Helion
Published 2020 ISBN 9781912866359
Format 96 pages, softbound MSRP (USD) $29.95

Review

Aleksandar Radic charts the last major European air wars of the 20th-century in The Yugoslav Air Force in the Battles for Slovenia, Croatia and Bosnia and Herzegovina 1991-92 (Volume 1): JRViPVO in Yugoslav War, 1991-1992 – fifth in Helion’s “Europe@War” range.

Available in North America from Casemate, the lavishly illustrated study spans six informative chapters over 96 pithy pages:

  • Background and Context
  • RV I PVO on the Eve of the War
  • War in Slovenia
  • Crisis in Croatia
  • Counter-Air Operations
  • All-Out War

In two introductory chapters, Radic chronicles Yugoslav Air Force history, aircraft, manufacturing, basing, and ordinance. Background commentary also explores the interrelationships of Yugoslav politics, planning, procurement, and production.

Did you know that the Yugoslav Air Force “was renowned for flying more training sorties annually than the Israeli Air Force”? Neither did I.

Notes on ethnic tensions and incidents precede the start of open, internecine warfare in the last four chapters.

Lots of spellbinding stuff here.

Why did Yugoslavia swap older, more powerful U.S. warplanes with greater load-carrying capabilities for domestic designs of patently less potential? Check here for the answer.

Sidebars, extended captions, explanatory endnotes, abbreviations glossary, tables, and references supplement the study.

Dozens of rare photos also season the survey. A dozen aircraft color plates by Tom Cooper provide potent project possibilities. And maps put commentary into geographic perspective.

Now line-up behind me for Volume 2.

Recommended!

With thanks to Casemate Publishing for the review copy!